The Benefits of Alpha Arbutin for Your Skin December 11 2015

Arbutin is derived from the leaves of the Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi), and prevents the formation of melanin – which is great new for all skin colors who wish to even out skin tone and fade those sun spots and built up pigmentation.  It is considered a natural and effective alternative for skin lightening, as well as a meaningful antioxidant that benefits skin greatly.

Arbutin is used in skin lightening treatments designed for long term and regular use. An active agent in brands of skin lightening preparations, it is more expensive than traditional skin lightening ingredients like hydroquinone, which is now banned in many countries. In vitro studies of human melanocytes exposed to arbutin at concentrations below 300 μg/mL reported decreased tyrosinase activity and melanin content with little evidence of cytotoxicity.

In a study published by the US National Library of Medicine, it was proven that arbutin revealed pigmentation suppression after 15 days of use by 43.5%, doing much better than aloesin and other skin lightening ingredients.  Clin Exp Dermatol. 2002 Sep;27(6):513-5.

While there are other websites that claim there is not enough evidence to suggest that arbutin is effective, has not done their research.  There are several significant studies that show it works very well and is a worthwhile alternative to harsh and synthetic skin lightening ingredients.

Keep in mind that while there are forums and websites that claim to have expert information, most contributors to the forums do not base their opinions on facts and have not conducted actual studies. Your safest bet is to go with the medical studies that offer factual information. While one ingredient may work well for one individual, it may not work well for another. It's best to know your facts and then give it a try. Below please find medical study references that support the information contained in this post.

Jeanette Quillen, Owner & Formulator

Tomita, Kenichi; Fukuda, Minoru; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi (1990) Mechanism of arbutin inhibitory effect on melanogenesis and effect on the human skin with cosmetic use. Fragrance Journal (1990), 18: 72-7.

Siegers, C. P.; Siegers, J. P.; Pentz, R.; Bodinet, C.; Freudenstein, J. (1997) Metabolism of arbutin from Uva ursi-extracts in humans. Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Letters 7: 90-92.

 Jin, Ying Hua; Lee, Suk Jin; Chung, Myung Hee; Park, Jeong Hill; Park, Young In; Cho, Tae Hyeong; Lee, Seung Ki. (1999) Aloesin and arbutin inhibit tyrosinase activity in a synergistic manner via a different action mechanism Archives of Pharmacal Research 22: 232-236.

Jin, Ying Hua; Lee, Suk Jin; Chung, Myung Hee; Park, Jeong Hill; Park, Young In; Cho, Tae Hyeong; Lee, Seung Ki. (1999) Aloesin and arbutin inhibit tyrosinase activity in a synergistic manner via a different action mechanism Archives of Pharmacal Research 22: 232-236.

Maeda, Kazuhisa; Fukuda, Minoru (1996) Arbutin: mechanism of its depigmenting action in human melanocyte culture. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 276: 765-9.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8642081

http://www.edermatologynews.com/views/cosmeceutical-critique-by-leslie-s-baumann/blog/arbutin/03cf7dc22ebceb00004530c4c777dec6.html