Everything You Need To Know About CoEnzyme Q10 February 12 2018

We have incorporated Coenzyme Q10 into a couple of our skin care treatments because of it's amazing benefits.  It's an extremely powerful antioxidant that's great as a supplement and as a topical ingredient.

There are a few supplements that almost everyone can benefit from (we're looking at you, probiotics), and there are others that are really worth the money if you have a specific condition or ailment that your body needs support to work though. On this list of supplements that really shine is Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), or ubiquinone, an antioxidant that your body produces naturally. CoQ10 has been around for a long time (it's an oldie but goody, if you will). If you're considering supplementing with it—or if you're just beginning your research into its uses in benefits—you've come to the right place. Here's what you need to know about it.

The basics.  What CoQ10 is and what it does.
As mentioned before, CoQ10 is an antioxidant found naturally in almost every cell of your body. Antioxidants are substances that help break down free radicals, which are molecules produced in the body that can cause damage. Free radicals are natural by-products of some cellular reactions, but things like too much alcohol and smoking can cause free radicals to build up, and this is bad news for your body. According to Dr. Robin Berzin, an integrative medicine physician and founder of Parsley Health, "When there are too many free radicals floating around, these highly reactive entities damage the healthy parts of your body they come in contact with. When free radicals come into contact with DNA, they can damage it, even causing mutations that lead to cancer. Free radicals also play a role in heart disease, stroke, arthritis, alcoholic liver damage, and even the aging process."

The good news is that your body produces antioxidants, which find and neutralize free radicals to turn them into harmless substances, so it has a built-in defense. Other antioxidants that your body produces naturally include vitamin E, vitamin C, flavonoids, phenols, ligands, and the master antioxidant glutathione, which has been shown to boost levels of all the other antioxidants floating around in the body. You can also get antioxidants from outside sources. The best sources? Plant-based foods like fruits, veggies, nuts, seeds, herbs and spices, and foods like cocoa and green tea. Lucky for us, high-antioxidant foods are normally also high in fiber and good sources of vitamins and minerals, so you're getting a plethora of benefits in one food.

What is it and where does it come from?

Rich sources of CoEnzyme Q10 come from fish, meat, nuts, soybeans, fruit, vegetables and eggs. 

Before you go out and get a supplement, you should know that there are various foods that are naturally high in CoQ10. Increasing your intake of these foods is a great way to get more CoQ10—and antioxidants in general—in your life. So what foods are highest in this nutrient? Here's a list to get you started:

Oily fish: Fish like salmon, tuna, sardines, and mackerel are high in antioxidant CoQ10 and are also high in healthy fats.

Organ meats: Liver and kidney meats also have high levels of coenzyme Q10.

Vegetables: Veggies like spinach, broccoli, and cauliflower naturally contain high levels of this antioxidant.

Legumes like peanuts and soybeans are the best non-animal sources of the substance.

Unlike vitamin D or other nutrients, CoQ10 deficiencies are not that common in the general population. That being said, your body's natural CoQ10 production does decrease as you age, and deficiencies have been related to some specific conditions, so for some people, getting their daily CoQ10 from their body's natural production and foods might not be enough. If you do decide that a supplement is right for you, here's how to find one that you can trust.

Stocking your pantry with quick sources are highly recommended – almonds, pistachios and sardines. It is in every cell of the body (the name ubiquinone stems from its ubiquity), but is present in higher concentrations in organs with higher energy requirements such as the kidneys, liver, and heart.

What can it do for you?

CoEnzyme Q10 is a powerful antioxidant that your body naturally makes, but can decrease for individuals over 35. Internally, there are studies that show that it can improve the symptoms of muscular dystrophy, as well as slow the progression of dementia and Alzheimer’s. Topically, it has been proven to be a very important part of anti aging skin care. Biofactors has medical study documentation that shows it decreased the depth of wrinkles and helped dramatically protect the skin against UVA radiation. It has the distinct ability to block the suns damaging rays that create and spread melanoma. Topically applied CoQ10 penetrates the skin’s surface to the living layers of the epidermis, where it reduced oxidative stress, a known contributor to aging and disease. Other studies show that it can boost the skin’s ability to repair itself and reduce free radical damage, slowing the aging process. Including this ingredient in one’s skin care and anti aging regime is insurance to ward off the signs of aging and protection from the elements.

Different uses for CoQ10.
There are a lot of different uses for CoQ10, but one of its major roles in the body is to help convert the food we eat into energy to power our bodies and brain. That being said, the effects of CoQ10 do not end at energy production. In fact, researchers think it may be able to help with conditions like heart disease, immune function, diabetes, cognition, and even migraines because of its antioxidant activity, effect on energy production, and ability to prevent blood clots. Here are a few of the exciting areas of research when it comes to this antioxidant:

CoQ10 and energy production.
Energy conversion in the body is one of those things we rarely really think about, but it's crucial to our overall health. We can eat all the amazing, nutritious foods we want, but if our bodies can't take those nutrients and convert them into usable energy—a process that takes place inside our cells and has everything to do with the mitochondria—we aren't going to get very far. What are mitochondria? At revitalize 2017, Dr. Frank Lipman, an integrative medicine physician and mbg health expert, explained that, "The mitochondria are power plants in the cells that turn your food and oxygen into energy in the form of ATP. These mitochondria power the biochemical reactions in your cells. To me, they are the Western equivalent of chi, or energy." Dysfunctions in the mitochondria can majorly affect your health (and may explain why you're tired ALL the time). Dr. Ilene Ruhoy, an integrative neurologist and one of mbg's favorite brain health experts, says that CoQ10 is a mainstay in mitochondrial support. Why? Because "Coenzyme Q10 carries the electrons that are needed to make the complex chain of enzymes work." The take-home message? Energy production and CoQ10 are intricately connected. (If you want to learn about other supplements Dr. Ruhoy recommends for optimizing energy levels, click here!)

CoQ10 and heart disease.
Studies have suggested that CoQ10 might be able to prevent a heart attack recurrence in people who have already suffered from a heart attack. One study, specifically, showed that patients were less likely to have another heart attack and chest pain if they took CoQ10 within three days of having a heart attack. There is also some research to support the idea that people with congestive heart failure might have low levels of CoQ10, and studies have also shown that supplementing might benefit people with high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Another study on over 100 patients showed that taking a combo of CoQ10 and other nutrients could be linked to a quicker recovery after bypass and other heart surgeries. In other words: If you have heart disease in your family, are struggling with it currently, and are interested in supplements, talking to your doctor about CoQ10 has some scientific validity behind it.

CoQ10 and hypertension.
According to Dr. Joel Kahn, a cardiologist and professor in our Advanced Functional Nutrition Training, "a group called the Cochrane Database Review looked at studies of CoQ10 for hypertension and found an average 11 mmHg BP drop, which is similar to many prescription medications." Other studies, however, have found that CoQ10 didn't have much of an effect on blood pressure, so there are some mixed results. (And remember, you should always talk to your doctor before starting any supplement regime.)

CoQ10 and reproductive disorders.
According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), there is some evidence that CoQ10 might improve semen quality and sperm count in men struggling with infertility. It's not entirely clear if this will, in reality, improve chances of conception, but the research looks promising.

CoQ10 and statin drugs.
Taking statin drugs may lower a person's levels of CoQ10, and some studies have shown that taking this supplement might improve some of the side effects of statin drugs, mainly muscle weakness that some patients experience.

CoQ10 and brain health.
Some studies have shown that people with cognitive disorders have lower levels of CoQ10 in their blood than people with healthy brain function. Other research has suggested that supplementing might slow deterioration in cognition for people with Alzheimer's disease, but more research is needed on the effects of this antioxidant on cognitive function and brain health.

CoQ10 and migraines.
The science on this is also only preliminary, but some research points to the thought that CoQ10 can help with migraines.

CoQ10 and gum disease.
According to Dr. Joel Kahn, CoQ10 levels may be low in people with gum disease, and some research has suggested that boosting levels by taking supplements or applying it topically can help speed gum healing.

CoQ10 and other illnesses.
According to the NIH, various research studies have looked at the effects of CoQ10 for ALS, Down syndrome, Parkinson's, diabetes, and even age-related changes in genes, but none of them have been definitive.

You will greatly benefit by adding a skin care product that contains CoEnzyme Q10 in your daily regime can greatly benefit your anti aging efforts.  We have two excellent options, freshly batched the day your order it:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10416055
http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART03367/Coenzyme-Q10-CoQ10.html
http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2006/8/report_coq10/Page-01
https://www.mindbodygreen.com