Is it Okay to Use Retinol and Niacinamide Together?

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is it okay to use retinol and niacinamide together

Is it Okay to Use Retinol and Niacinamide Together?

As you'll find below, there are proven benefits to using retinol and niacinamide together - but not so fast. It depends on a few things before to move on ahead. Here's we'll go over some tips and advice based on medical studies.

What is retinol and niacinamide?

Retinol is a form of Vitamin A, readily available over the counter, and highly beneficial to skin care. Retinol is not as strong as the prescription Retin-A or Tretinoin. Retinol travels into the skin to reduce free radicals, which in turn encourages the skin to increase healthier cell turnover. Retinol can improve the appearance of wrinkles, acne, scarring, large pores, and discoloration.

Niacinamide is a form of B-3 that helps build the proteins in the skin as well as can help correct discoloration. It is an anti inflammatory, so a very good choice for acneic skin, irritated or rashy skin. Niacinamide also has the capability of reducing pore size.

Our Ultra Repairing Night Cream includes niacinamide and retinol, and ships for free in the US. It's entire ingredient list is plant and earth derived, and free of chemicals or synthetics. There's no easier way to use niacinamide and retinol together.

Benefits of using retinol and niacinamide

While it might sound like you're stacking your ingredients too much by using them together - they are in fact an excellent team when paired at the same time. Because niacinamide can help calm skin and reduce irritation, it's a nice compliment to retinol, which will help your skin rejuvenate with consistent use.

Is it safe to use retinol and niacinamide together?

It is safe to use retinol and niacinamide together, as they compliment each other quite well. If you use this combination during the day, or regardless of your skin care routine, be sure to use a mineral sunscreen to prevent sun exposure and irritation.

If you generally have sensitive skin, then it might be best to try using at separate times of the day, say niacinamide during the day and retinol in the evening. You can test this for yourself to determine your comfort level. Most over the counter retinol options are quite comfortable and do not seem harsh, so using them together is a great choice if you want to consider it.

When to use retinol and niacinamide in your skincare routine

You can use them both at the same time if you wish, even during the day, but be sure to layer on top with a mineral sunscreen to add protection and reduce irritation.

How to layer retinol and niacinamide

There is no actual preference to which you add first, and adding them together at the same time is fine. You'll be pleased to know that our Ultra Repairing Night Cream includes both Niacinamide and Retinol, which make your skin care routine so much easier, and it ships for free in the US.

Common side effects of using retinol and niacinamide

Almost everyone can tolerate the combination of retinol and niacinamide used at the same time. Neither niacinamide or over the counter retinol is considered harsh or difficult to use, and using them together has it clear benefits as noted above.

As mentioned previously, if you find that using niacinamide and retinol together causes some skin irritation, use these ingredients separately. Perhaps one during the day and one in the evening.

Products that contain retinol and niacinamide

Our Ultra Repairing Night Cream includes niacinamide and retinol, and ships for free in the US. It's entire ingredient list is plant and earth derived, and free of chemicals or synthetics. There's no easier way to use niacinamide and retinol together.

Conclusion

It's safe and in some ways advantageous to use retinol and niacinamide together. Niacinamide is an anti inflammatory and calms skin, making it a great partner for retinol. It's always a smart idea to use sunscreen during the day regardless of your time spent outside, but especially when using active ingredients such as these - retinol and niacinamide.

 

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